The agreement reached during the 2015 global climate change conference in Paris (COP21) marked a fundamental step forward in the fight against climate change. The conference resulted in a plan to control climate-altering emissions over the medium and long term, with the support of a solid regulatory governance, which has traditionally been uncertain due to continual political changes. The main aim of the agreement is to limit the increase in global temperature to below 2 °C and to strive not to exceed 1.5 °C.

In November 2016, COP22, was held in Marrakech. Participants made progress with the technical discussions on procedures to implement the Paris Agreement for post-2020 and the strength of the political commitment following the Paris Agreement was confirmed. In the short term, implementing instruments will be necessary for the continuity of the operations and to ensure stability for long-term investments. Discussions focused on the transparency of monitoring, reporting and verification procedures, and the criteria for periodic evaluation and potential updating of the objectives set by the parties.

COP23 took place in Bonn in 2017, resuming the transparency of monitoring, reporting and verification procedures, the criteria for periodic evaluation and potential updating of the objectives. The Conference also focused on the state-of-play on financial commitments, capacity building initiatives and international technology transfer. On the opening day of the conference, a number of large European energy companies – including Enel – appealed to the European Commission to raise the target for renewable energy consumption in Europe from 27% to 35% of the total by 2030. The European Parliament accepted this proposal in January 2018. The next global climate conference, COP24, will take place in Katowice, Poland, in 2018.